Teaching Sight Words to Reluctant Readers Part 2

As I stated in the first post in this series, I believe that teaching sight words {and vocabulary} in context is the most effective way to get the words to actually move from the front of the brain – all the way into the sticky part way in the back. {obviously not a biology major} Winking smile 

When we teach in context and not in isolation we bring the words to life, we give them a purpose and our children see that the words we use, have a use.

When we first started formal school for Zack I used the units from The Moffat Girls. They were bright, and fun and the repetition was great. But much to my dismay Zack hated it. While my older daughter looked on with green envy in her eye over the “fun” activities her brother got to do. I was met with much groans and frustration. He didn’t want to color, cut, and paste even if the activities were so darn cute!

So this year I scrapped all that cutesy stuff and stuck to the basics. Our day is much more enjoyable, although not without it’s struggles.

Here is how it looks now.

I start the week by introducing a few new sight words. I usually only choose 5 and I make those five words part of his spelling for the week.

I provide lots of exposure to those words through books, magazines, lessons, activities, and  games. I also try to point them out when ever we see them while we are out and about.

sight word matching

I consider the words mastered when I am able to hand him a book with those words in it and he can independently read it.

DSCN0758

If we get to the end of the week and he is still struggling (sigh, it does happen) then I just add those words to the next weeks list.

Simple.

Effective.

 

Next week I will share some of the fun games we have done to reinforce our learning.

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